Daybreak Shelter Service Schedule

Daybreak Homeless Shelter in Joliet, IllinoisJoin me and other volunteers—mainly from Friendship United Methodist Church—as we prepare food, serve it, and speak with shelter residents at Daybreak on the third Friday and Saturday of each month in Joliet, Illinois.  I’ve coordinated this program for well over a decade.  Watch a VIDEO of some of our times at Daybreak.  You can learn more and find related links in the post accompanying the video.

One of the greatest things parents can give their children is a passion and vision for serving, and bringing the whole family to Daybreak is a great way to start.

My own children started with me when they were well under ten. In a newspaper article my oldest—Rick Guzman—credits this early experience with beginning a passion for solving housing problems that continues in big ways today.  It’s at the center of his career.

Read that article (“Seeds of Change“) and see below for other resources.

2017 Schedule

November 17-18
December 15-16

2018 Schedule

January 17-18
February 16-17
March 16-17
April 20-21
May 18-19
June 15-16
July 20-21
August 17-18
September 15, 21*
October 19-20
November 16-17
December 15, 21*

Service times:
5:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. for Friday dinner.
5:00 A.M. to 7:00 a.m. for Saturday breakfast.

Address: 611 Cass St. (Route 30), Joliet, IL

* Note: Our service times are usually consecutive Fridays and Saturdays. However, when the 1st of the month falls on a Saturday—as it does one to three times a year—our days split. We serve an early-Saturday breakfast first, then Friday dinner the following week.

____________________

  Contact me, Richard R. Guzman, if you’d like to help.

  Learn more about homelessness and our work with advocate Diane Nilan HEREIn 1988 she started what became Daybreak.

  Go to the main pages for Emmanuel House and for Chicago Family Directions, two organizations that also help with housing and education.

  See a video about Feed My Starving Children, another organization helping to feed the hungry.

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